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The Magical World of Surrealist Paintings

Towards the end of the First World War, many artists who had moved to different parts of the world from Paris became proponents of the Dadaism movement which held the belief that the war was a result of excessive rationalization, and an increase in bourgeois living. The way in which Dadaists protested the war was with anti-art movements, different performances, art works, and literary works. History tells us that the first seeds of thought regarding the Surrealist movement were conceptualized from the remnants of the Dadaism movement. The person who can be called the founder of the Surrealism movement was Andre Breton who regarded the movement a form of revolution. The definition as given by him says that it is a “pure psychic automatism, by which one proposes to express, either verbally, in writing, or by any other manner, the real functioning of thought. Dictation of thought in the absence of all control exercised by reason, outside of all aesthetic and moral preoccupation.”

Extremely influenced by Freudian theories, Surrealism is in a manner the expression of imagination as seen in one’s dreams. The entire gamut of Freud’s theories that dealt with free association, analysis of dreams, and of the

Abstract Expressionism Art

History

The artists related to this movement were a group of very diverse individuals, who came together in New York’s Greenwich village. The major ones were Jackson Pollock, Mark Rothko, Barnett Newman, Lee Krasner, Mark Tobey, Kenneth Noland, Robert Motherwell, Franz Kline, and William de Kooning. Their works vary greatly; from the brooding melancholic works of Rothko to the more flamboyant pieces of Pollock. This movement promoted the painting of abstract work instead of any representation. It was greatly criticized by the critics who considered it to be too avant-garde due to its lack of figuration and bold brush strokes. Due to the depression, and crisis brought on by the war, the artists started to depict human vulnerability.

Description

Several artists during the above mentioned period, started experimenting with different shapes and colors. They broke away from conventional painting styles, and painted huge canvases in blue, orange, red, or other bold colors. The movement is characterized by splattering of paint and powerful brush strokes. The artists preferred larger canvases that were positioned on the floor over canvases that were easel bound and moderate. The focus of this art was not in mere portrayal of objects, but the expression of emotions. There

History of Pointillism and Divisionism

In the 1880s, Seurat was one of the first to develop pointillism. Paul Signac was another founder of the style, and other prominent artists using the technique included Vincent van Gogh, Henri-Edmond Cross, John Roy, and Henri Delavallee. Pointillism was first called ‘divisionism’ by its practitioners. The name ‘pointillism’ developed only later, and was intended to mock the style. Today ‘pointillism’ is an accepted term for this style, and has no derisive connotations. Some people still use the term ‘divisionism’ to refer to paintings similar to pointillism, but this label is more accurately used to emphasize the technical color theory that is employed in many such paintings. While pointillism uses small dots to create the impression of form and structure, divisionism creates unique color impressions by juxtaposing dots of different colors according to principles of color and vision.

How Does Pointillism Work?

In a typical pointillist painting, you might see a colorful landscape that appears to include a wide range of vibrant colors. If you look closely, say at a patch of aquamarine or teal water, you will see that this bright color is really composed of tiny dots of yellow, green, and blue. By altering the combination

Cleaning Oil Paintings Tips

Oil paintings are sturdy and durable, which when managed with proper care can last for many generations. Unfortunately, not all people who possess them are aware of the processes needed for their maintenance. Considering this, it is not uncommon to damage such priceless possessions. An understanding of the basic tips to clean such pieces of art will help in preserving their pristine beauty. The instructions are discussed as follows.

Step #1
First, gather all the items required like a brush with soft bristles, a cotton cloth, and vacuum cleaner (with micro attachment kit). If you are planning to clean both the back and front of the painting, then carefully remove the painting and place it on a plain surface. You can cover the back with a clean paper so as to prevent dirt accumulation.

Step #2
Fix the micro nozzle in the vacuum and gently remove the dust and dirt from the surface of the painting. Clean the corners with a soft bristle brush. If it is hard to reach the corners with the vacuum or the brush, you can wipe out the dust by using a soft cloth.

Step #3
In case the varnish (outer protective surface) of the painting

Characteristics of Realistic Art

Realism in visual arts is basically about moving over the interpretation, personal bias, subjectivity or emotionalism and depicting the painting theme in an empirical sense. Realists rejected the characteristics of Romantic art as they believed in portraying objects with a sense of objective reality. Thus, the artists didn’t use techniques to change the appearance of the object. For instance, an artist who follows the Realistic art tradition would never attempt to conceal any flaws in the object or scene he/she is painting. The Realism art movement can also be associated with the age of positivism. Positivism is all about gaining knowledge using scientific methods of observation and objective evaluation. In art, this translates to depiction of objects as they are. One must not allow subjectivity and imagination to affect the depiction of the objects. Realism in art is all about rejecting idealization. Those who follow the realistic tradition in art believe in an accurate portrayal of ordinary people and events. The artist’s muse shouldn’t be someone who is larger-than-life or glorious always. This explains why artists who follow this tradition didn’t believe in painting the Gods, Goddesses or heroes. Their aim was to depict the daily life with

How to do Graffiti Art

  • The first thing you need to do is observe. Go around the town and look at various artist’s graffiti work. If you can’t find graffiti anywhere in your town, then do an image search for various styles of graffiti writing. Save some images that you like and would like to draw in a similar style. You can take out the prints of these images and keep tracing on them, to get a feel of the lines of the alphabets and background design.
  • Copy a graffiti style that you saw on the internet and to learn graffiti letters keep scribbling these letters. Also, watch the kind of color the artist has used, the way the shadow is placed under the alphabets, the kind of backgrounds are sketched behind the graffiti letters, etc. Pick up a style of simple graffiti font, rounded bubbles font, or edgy hooks and barbs-like font are quite popular. Then on a piece of paper draw a small word with number if you prefer. Draw a thumbnail graffiti sketch of the word on one corner of the paper.
  • Then using a pencil draw a bigger sketch on the paper. Behind the letter draw the

Steps to Make Graffiti Letters

To improve and keep excelling in creating innovative designs and/or writings, all you have to do is keep your mind open for anything. This art finds inspiration from basically anything around us and you can incorporate that into your art.

Step 1: Understand the different types of letters and styles. If you live in an area where graffiti is not very common, then visit a city or downtown for inspiration. The more styles you come across, the more you can visualize the entire picture and characteristics.

Step 2: Get a piece of paper and write down some name, place, or any word for that matter. You can also start with your own name (it works best with beginners). By learning to write your own name can provide you with a unique signature for yourself. Take a pencil and print each letters in capital. Don’t press down too hard as you might have to erase a couple of times before perfecting it. Keep some space between each letters as the space will be utilized once you start filling them.

Step 3: You can choose any style of writing as you want. It can be bubble letters, sharp edged letters, rounded

Learning to Draw Graffiti

Today, megalopolises are the nerve center of graffiti, as a modern art. Though it’s the subject of much criticism, being used as a vandalism tool, there are many commissioned artists who work around the world to create some of the most beautiful graffiti paintings. Graffiti has been used by many artists in expressing rebellion against all kinds of authoritarian regimes and conformism. If you are planning to create your very own, first graffito, this Buzzle article will definitely be an interesting read.

Observation

The question of how to do graffiti can be well answered by following the first basic step of any art form that is observation. Learning to appreciate great pieces of graffiti art is the first step as an initiate. If you only keep your eyes open, while driving around town, you will find scores of graffiti art pieces, painted on city walls. Get familiar with the various styles of graffiti, ranging from stencils, 3D, bubble, BBoy, billboard, cartoons and other new emerging trends. To know a style is not just about appreciating its aesthetics. It’s also about learning technique. Know what kind of colors and painting tools have been used. Analyze a composition

Basic Techniques of Oil Painting

There are different oil painting techniques without which one cannot paint to one’s potential. However, grasping these techniques will take a considerable amount of study. Some of the basics pertaining to these techniques are as follows:

Dagger Stroke : This stroke is not about trying to capture any sort of image on the canvas, but is about empowering the canvas with one’s creative energy. To comprehend the pros of this stroke, one needs to realize how a subject or image is molded. In oil painting, one is actually molding the image, similar to what a sculptor would do with clay. The strokes require energy and involve dagger shapes brought onto the canvas surface by the brush. The most interesting aspect about this stroke is that the end result can be so crude and raw, that nobody except the artist knows what has been painted. However, the subject in question will be hidden in the foundation. According to the artist’s desire, the subject can be subtly or boldly revealed to the viewers. The subtleness of these strokes can keep viewers mesmerized for years together.

Painting Knife Technique : This

Pop Culture and Artifacts

When you think about objects that define pop culture, what are the things that you first think of? Well, chances are that more often than not all those images are pop culture items (including Kermit the frog, Archie Bunker’s chair, and even Hannah Montana ). The effect of the phenomenon is such that it permeates and captures the imagination of the masses. While not many of us may be familiar with the works of Caravaggio or the theories of Nietzsche, most of us would have devoured Archie comics and read every Dan Brown book. That is the power of pop culture. These cannot be restricted to literal objects, as ideas, images, attitudes, people, phenomena, are all a part and parcel of world and American popular culture.

There are many experts who have spent a lot of their time studying one or the other artifact in popular culture. Most people while analyzing these artifacts use two forms of analysis – an interpretive textual analysis and content analysis. The former helps in examining the literal and social meanings of the object at hand and how they are linked to larger subjects prevalent in society. The latter studies it in quantitative terms.