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Category Archives: Art

Aboriginal Art: Five Most Fascinating Facts

Based on their ‘Creation Myths’
Every art form that is Aboriginal, is primarily based on their ancient myths and legends. Even the modern pieces of Aboriginal art are based on ‘the Dreamtime’, a set of their creation myths. These ‘Dreamtime’ myths, which are more than 50,000 years old, are a great storehouse of their oral heritage which has been handed down from generation to generation. Interestingly, our only source of the ‘Dreamtime’ stories, of course other than the Aborigines themselves, is Aboriginal art, owing to the fact that we have no written sources of the same.

More than just Art
The Aborigines did not seem to believe in the philosophy of ‘art for art’s sake’. On the contrary, the Aborigines wrote through their arts. We get a large number of references with respect to their day-to-day lives, festivities and celebrations, modes of pastime, religious beliefs, social structure, hunting practices and so on. Apart from being a mode of expression and depiction, art was also used as a platform to maintain secrecy. After the colonization of Australia, the Aborigines felt that their spiritual and clandestine knowledge was in danger, and so it was thought that there needed to be a system with which they could hide it from the eyes of ‘outsiders’. The famous Aboriginal dot paintings resulted from this fear. It is believed that the dots were purposely made over holy symbolic depictions so that they could obscure the sacred knowledge.

More than what Meets the Eye
The depictions of Aborigines were naturalistic, as well as abstract in nature. The term ‘naturalistic’ refers to the depiction of natural surroundings, flora and fauna. So, we have depictions of animals, plants, people and other natural phenomena in various forms. On the other hand, the term ‘abstract’ refers to depictions, which may seem unrealistic at a first glance, but may in actuality possess much deeper connotations. So, we also have a huge array of drawings with geometrical shapes and symbols, which we, as the ‘other’ may not understand, but the Aborigines would definitely do.

Use of Natural Colors and Stabilizers
The colors used for their paintings were obtained from natural and locally available materials, predominantly ochre, a natural mineral, which was ground on a stone slab while adding small amounts of water and stabilizing agent. Red, yellow and white colors were obtained from different pigments of ochre, and so we see a wide usage of these colors in Aboriginal paintings. Black was obtained from charcoal, but was rarely used owing to the complicated procedure of making it. Olive color, which can be seen in some of the paintings was obtained by mixing black and yellow colors. It is very fascinating how the ancient Aborigines figured out a natural resource in the juice of an orchid plant, which could be used as a fixative to avoid flaking or peeling of the paint. Modern Aboriginal artists on the other hand, use artificial colors as well.

The Aboriginal Art Movement
Modern techniques of depicting Aboriginal art forms on canvas and paper, came into being some 40 years ago in 1971, when a school teacher named Geoffrey Bardon, noticed a group of Aboriginal men telling stories and drawing symbols in sand. This caught his interest and he encouraged those men to depict their stories on canvas and paper, two media, which were completely alien to them before that day. Thus started the famous ‘Aboriginal Art Movement’ which encouraged more and more Aboriginal artists to present their works before the world and become famous. Some non-Aboriginal artists also showed their interest in this art form, and began to practice it. Not surprisingly, Aboriginal art is considered to be the most inspiring contemporary art of the 20th century.

Intriguing Facts

♣ Bark paintings are the oldest forms of Aboriginal paintings. However, not many of them survive today due to natural disintegration of the bark.
♣ Aboriginal art symbols are collectively known as iconography. Aboriginal people traveled long distances across their country and recorded information regarding their travel in the form of symbols.
♣ A particular Aboriginal art symbol would have multiple meanings. Only an Aborigine, who knew his history and culture would be able to decipher what symbol had what meaning in what context.
♣ Numerous Aboriginal paintings have been discovered on sacred sites. This throws light on their sacred connotations.
♣ As remnants of the ancient Aboriginal culture, we have what has been termed as ‘aerial landscape art’ created across the Australian deserts. These cannot be figured out easily from the ground level, but a bird’s-eye view of these sites gives us a feel that we are actually looking at wonderful sculptures.
♣ The X-ray style paintings are one of the distinctive features of Aboriginal art. Apart from the outer bodies of the animals/humans, the internal organs and bones are also depicted in them. This also shows that the ancient Aborigines did have an idea of animal/human anatomy.
♣ There are two museums, which have been specially dedicated to the Aboriginal arts and crafts. These are the Museum of Contemporary Aboriginal Art, located in Utrecht in the Netherlands, and the Aboriginal Art Collection of the University of Virginia, known as the Kluge-Ruhe.
♣ Body painting is an art that is of great cultural significance for the Aborigines. The motifs, which are painted on their bodies, particularly during religious ceremonies, not only signify their social status, but also depict totemic symbols of various clans by which they can be identified.
♣ Aboriginal art forms include their sculptures and specially carved pearl shells called ‘Rijis’. Sacred patterns are carved on these shells, thus giving them religious affiliations. We also have a number of small sculptures of imp-like creatures, locally known as the ‘Mimis’. They are believed to have taught the Aborigines’ ancestors to hunt and to make use of fire. Hence, they are revered beings.

The Magical World of Surrealist Paintings

Towards the end of the First World War, many artists who had moved to different parts of the world from Paris became proponents of the Dadaism movement which held the belief that the war was a result of excessive rationalization, and an increase in bourgeois living. The way in which Dadaists protested the war was with anti-art movements, different performances, art works, and literary works. History tells us that the first seeds of thought regarding the Surrealist movement were conceptualized from the remnants of the Dadaism movement. The person who can be called the founder of the Surrealism movement was Andre Breton who regarded the movement a form of revolution. The definition as given by him says that it is a “pure psychic automatism, by which one proposes to express, either verbally, in writing, or by any other manner, the real functioning of thought. Dictation of thought in the absence of all control exercised by reason, outside of all aesthetic and moral preoccupation.”

Extremely influenced by Freudian theories, Surrealism is in a manner the expression of imagination as seen in one’s dreams. The entire gamut of Freud’s theories that dealt with free association, analysis of dreams, and of the unconscious, were extremely important to the artists who were a part of this movement. Most artists of the movement laid their claim on eccentricity without an acceptance of being mad. As can be figured out from what Salvador Dali very famously said, “There is only one difference between a madman and me. I am not mad.”

Another important characteristic of the movement was the juxtaposition of elements that were rarely ever actually featured together. The aim behind combining two disparate elements was to create something that shocked and startled. Most artists of the movement aimed at breaking the shackles that bound people to conventional, rational behavior, and customs and traditions.

One of the most famous painters on a Surrealist canvas was very obviously Salvador Dali, who helped popularizing this art movement. A lot has been said and written about the relation between the art movement and Dali and the effect that the artist had on the way people perceived this artistic movement. If you study the art form in detail, you will see that there is a lot of technique involved, as well as focus on content. But despite this, there was an attempt to appreciate what an untrained artist would see as art. This stemmed from the belief that free from rules, a mind tends to be more imaginative in the ideas it generates.

Most artists who painted in the Surrealist form, used free association and one of two methods of expression; Absolute Surrealism and Veristic Surrealism. While the former believed in the expression of ideas of the subconscious, the latter focused on creating a connection between the abstract and the real. Salvador Dali worked in the Veristic school, often juxtaposing images from the real world with imaginary situations. It is believed that movements of the art world like Abstract Expressionism and Magic Realism were born from this movement. Lowbrow art is also a throwback from this art movement.

It is difficult to understand this movement completely without maybe taking a lesson. Paintings like Elle Loge La Folie, Indefinite Divisibility, or Woman with Her Throat Cut, are works that just give you an insight into the shock and awe that Surrealism art inspires.

Abstract Expressionism Art

History

The artists related to this movement were a group of very diverse individuals, who came together in New York’s Greenwich village. The major ones were Jackson Pollock, Mark Rothko, Barnett Newman, Lee Krasner, Mark Tobey, Kenneth Noland, Robert Motherwell, Franz Kline, and William de Kooning. Their works vary greatly; from the brooding melancholic works of Rothko to the more flamboyant pieces of Pollock. This movement promoted the painting of abstract work instead of any representation. It was greatly criticized by the critics who considered it to be too avant-garde due to its lack of figuration and bold brush strokes. Due to the depression, and crisis brought on by the war, the artists started to depict human vulnerability.

Description

Several artists during the above mentioned period, started experimenting with different shapes and colors. They broke away from conventional painting styles, and painted huge canvases in blue, orange, red, or other bold colors. The movement is characterized by splattering of paint and powerful brush strokes. The artists preferred larger canvases that were positioned on the floor over canvases that were easel bound and moderate. The focus of this art was not in mere portrayal of objects, but the expression of emotions. There was in fact, an almost aggressive application of paint, which created a highly intense and dynamic imagery. Jackson Pollock created a revolutionary new technique of splattering and pouring thinned oil paint into a canvas, which was laid on the ground instead of being supported by easels.

Broadly speaking, this art consisted of two streams – Color Field Painting and Action Painting. The former was developed during the early part of 1960s, and involved creating art that was based on simplified and larger than life color dominated fields. The compositions were huge colored areas with no recognizable forms or signs. The artist’s goal was to create a work of art, which was sublime and ethereal, rather than plainly beautiful. Rothko in particular painted soft blurring rectangles of luminescent color, which never failed to impress the viewers. In addition to Mark Rothko, Ellsworth Kelly and Helen Frankenthaler were some other painters, which were associated with this type of painting. Action Painting arose prior to Color Field Painting (between the 1940s and 1950s), and was practiced by artists such as Jackson Pollock, Willem de Kooning, and Franz Kline.

This movement peaked between 1942 to the mid 50s. It shifted the focus of the art world from Paris and Europe to America. This greatly influenced new generations of artists, who created their own art based on their individual expressions. By late 1969, the interest in this movement began to wane, and new movements such as minimalism and pop art, strongly began to influence the art community.

History of Pointillism and Divisionism

In the 1880s, Seurat was one of the first to develop pointillism. Paul Signac was another founder of the style, and other prominent artists using the technique included Vincent van Gogh, Henri-Edmond Cross, John Roy, and Henri Delavallee. Pointillism was first called ‘divisionism’ by its practitioners. The name ‘pointillism’ developed only later, and was intended to mock the style. Today ‘pointillism’ is an accepted term for this style, and has no derisive connotations. Some people still use the term ‘divisionism’ to refer to paintings similar to pointillism, but this label is more accurately used to emphasize the technical color theory that is employed in many such paintings. While pointillism uses small dots to create the impression of form and structure, divisionism creates unique color impressions by juxtaposing dots of different colors according to principles of color and vision.

How Does Pointillism Work?

In a typical pointillist painting, you might see a colorful landscape that appears to include a wide range of vibrant colors. If you look closely, say at a patch of aquamarine or teal water, you will see that this bright color is really composed of tiny dots of yellow, green, and blue. By altering the combination of dots of primary colors, pointillist painters can create the illusion that they are using many more colors than they are. Using the viewer’s eye and brain to mix the colors can create a brighter impression than mixing pigments that absorb light. So the aquamarine you see is brighter and more vivid than the color that would have resulted if the painter had mixed yellow, green, and blue paint together. The white canvas between dots can enhance this effect.

Stippling – Black and White Pointillism

The same technique that is used in color pointillism can be used to create gray scale images. By using dots of only black and white, dynamic gray scale images can be produced. In art, this black and white technique is called stippling. Although it has been used in painting, it is more commonly used as a drawing technique. Halftone printing, the printing technique used in black and white newspaper printing, is a descendant of stippling.

Pointillism Today

Pictures in magazines and newspapers are printed in a method similar to pointillism. Small dots of only three or four colors are printed in such a way that they create the illusion of other colors printed on the page. Even photographs are printed this way, giving the appearance of flesh tones and other photographic colors. Additionally, electronic screens like TVs use a similar technique. Screens display dots, or subpixels, of red, blue, and green at different intensities, and our eyes and brains interpret these collections of dots as detailed color images.

Learning about pointillism is interesting from more than just an art history point of view. The masters of pointillism created stunning masterpieces using this technique, but anyone can understand the basic concepts behind it. Children can learn about and practice pointillism in order to get hands-on experience that can help them to understand color mixing and the mechanisms of vision that make it possible. Because so many of our modern technologies rely on similar ideas to create the images we see around us, pointillism is a fascinating subject. Every image in Photoshop and in the newspaper, and even images people create out of Legos, mosaic tiles, and cake sprinkles could be thought of as modern pointillism.

Cleaning Oil Paintings Tips

Oil paintings are sturdy and durable, which when managed with proper care can last for many generations. Unfortunately, not all people who possess them are aware of the processes needed for their maintenance. Considering this, it is not uncommon to damage such priceless possessions. An understanding of the basic tips to clean such pieces of art will help in preserving their pristine beauty. The instructions are discussed as follows.

Step #1
First, gather all the items required like a brush with soft bristles, a cotton cloth, and vacuum cleaner (with micro attachment kit). If you are planning to clean both the back and front of the painting, then carefully remove the painting and place it on a plain surface. You can cover the back with a clean paper so as to prevent dirt accumulation.

Step #2
Fix the micro nozzle in the vacuum and gently remove the dust and dirt from the surface of the painting. Clean the corners with a soft bristle brush. If it is hard to reach the corners with the vacuum or the brush, you can wipe out the dust by using a soft cloth.

Step #3
In case the varnish (outer protective surface) of the painting turns yellowish or dull, you can check for a conservation liquid to clean the varnish. Check for the reliability of the product while purchasing it. You can apply the conservation liquid in one corner of the painting to test its reactions or after application effects.

Step #4
If you find the conservation solution good to the varnish, then continue applying the product all over the painting surface by using a cotton swab. For better results, carry out this step in a room with proper ventilation.

Step #5
Use a dampened cotton swab dip in distilled water to remove dirt from the surface. For an oily or sticky surface, you can prepare a solution by mixing a mild detergent in lukewarm water. Dampen a cotton cloth with the solution and clean the surface.

Step #6
If there are any cracks or fissures on the surface, gentle cleaning with a soft cloth is preferable. In case you are planning to do a painting on canvas, make sure you do a spot test in one corner prior to cleaning the whole canvas.

Characteristics of Realistic Art

Realism in visual arts is basically about moving over the interpretation, personal bias, subjectivity or emotionalism and depicting the painting theme in an empirical sense. Realists rejected the characteristics of Romantic art as they believed in portraying objects with a sense of objective reality. Thus, the artists didn’t use techniques to change the appearance of the object. For instance, an artist who follows the Realistic art tradition would never attempt to conceal any flaws in the object or scene he/she is painting. The Realism art movement can also be associated with the age of positivism. Positivism is all about gaining knowledge using scientific methods of observation and objective evaluation. In art, this translates to depiction of objects as they are. One must not allow subjectivity and imagination to affect the depiction of the objects. Realism in art is all about rejecting idealization. Those who follow the realistic tradition in art believe in an accurate portrayal of ordinary people and events. The artist’s muse shouldn’t be someone who is larger-than-life or glorious always. This explains why artists who follow this tradition didn’t believe in painting the Gods, Goddesses or heroes. Their aim was to depict the daily life with as much accuracy as possible.

Realists basically draw inspiration from contemporary life. The subject matter of their paintings generally includes daily scenes and ordinary people.They depict contemporary life in a realistic and accurate manner. For instance, after industrial revolution, many of the famous paintings from Realistic school of art depicted workers performing their tasks in factories. They tried to depict the workers as they looked. However ugly or unaesthetic the surroundings looked, the painter painted them with honesty, just as they existed. No changes were made to make them look aesthetically pleasing. If you go through the famous painters list, you will come across names such as Gustave Courbet, Honore Daumier, Jean-Francois Millet, John Singer Sargent, James McNeil Whistler, Jan Van Eyck and Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot. These were some of the famous painters who followed this art tradition. Movements such as the Ashcan School, the Contemporary Realist, and the American Scene Painters are also based on this art tradition. These painters believe in the painting what they see. The logic given by these artists is that the abstract objects, or the objects that are intangible or non-existent, don’t belong to the realm of painting.

The rejection of the Romantic art tradition is an important aspect of Realistic art. Painting ordinary people and daily scenes in a realistic manner is the objective of this form of art.

How to do Graffiti Art

  • The first thing you need to do is observe. Go around the town and look at various artist’s graffiti work. If you can’t find graffiti anywhere in your town, then do an image search for various styles of graffiti writing. Save some images that you like and would like to draw in a similar style. You can take out the prints of these images and keep tracing on them, to get a feel of the lines of the alphabets and background design.
  • Copy a graffiti style that you saw on the internet and to learn graffiti letters keep scribbling these letters. Also, watch the kind of color the artist has used, the way the shadow is placed under the alphabets, the kind of backgrounds are sketched behind the graffiti letters, etc. Pick up a style of simple graffiti font, rounded bubbles font, or edgy hooks and barbs-like font are quite popular. Then on a piece of paper draw a small word with number if you prefer. Draw a thumbnail graffiti sketch of the word on one corner of the paper.
  • Then using a pencil draw a bigger sketch on the paper. Behind the letter draw the shadow. Decide an angle of the shadows, and follow the same angle for all the letters, this will give a 3D raised appearance to the letter.
  • After you are done with this, draw a background for the letters. Twisted overlapping arrows, fire, bubbles, and blocks are commonly used as graffiti backgrounds. So, you can pick a similar theme, and even give the background a shadow to give a 3D appearance.
  • Make sure you maintain good proportions of the letters with each other and the size of the letters and background with each other. You can use an eraser to make corrections.
  • Now, once you are done with you pencil drawing, you can consider taking a backup of your sketch. You can take a photocopy of the sketch, in case you make mistakes while coloring your drawing.
  • Use ink to color the shadows, you can also use a black sketch pen if you don’t have ink. Then fill up the letters with a color which is bright and stands out nicely. You can even make a three or two colored theme while filling up the letters, or use more colors to give a gradient-like effect.
  • Then fill up the background with colors, which are not so bright, otherwise they can steal the attention from the main characters which you want to give focus on. There you are done with your first graffiti sketch. This way keep practicing for 2 – 3 months, till you get the hang of graffiti letters. Then create your own cool graffiti font and write down letters from A to Z. Then make a graffiti drawing with colors using your own style.
  • Once you have developed your own style to draw graffiti, it is time to execute your art on a real wall.
  • Make sure you select a site where graffiti is legally allowed, or you can get in trouble.
  • Buy spray cans of colors which you have used in your drawing. Keep a scanned copy of the graffiti drawing in your computer, in case your original drawing gets ruined. If your original drawing has come really fine, consider laminating it so that even if something spills on it you can just wipe it off.
  • On the wall slowly and neatly draw the letters, the background, and 3D shadows. Then fill them up with colors.
  • Avoid going crazy with the colors, as you can ruin the graffiti. In initial stage it is good to stick to less colors rather than more.
  • Once you are done with your graffiti, draw your signature on the bottom right corner.

Steps to Make Graffiti Letters

To improve and keep excelling in creating innovative designs and/or writings, all you have to do is keep your mind open for anything. This art finds inspiration from basically anything around us and you can incorporate that into your art.

Step 1: Understand the different types of letters and styles. If you live in an area where graffiti is not very common, then visit a city or downtown for inspiration. The more styles you come across, the more you can visualize the entire picture and characteristics.

Step 2: Get a piece of paper and write down some name, place, or any word for that matter. You can also start with your own name (it works best with beginners). By learning to write your own name can provide you with a unique signature for yourself. Take a pencil and print each letters in capital. Don’t press down too hard as you might have to erase a couple of times before perfecting it. Keep some space between each letters as the space will be utilized once you start filling them.

Step 3: You can choose any style of writing as you want. It can be bubble letters, sharp edged letters, rounded edges, equal sized letters, or mismatched letters. Start with one style, perfect it and then you can learn various shapes and sizes. As there are no rules, the possibilities are endless. Who knows, you might just create a unique style in the process.

Step 4: Once you’re done writing, you will make outline on each of the letters. This outline will depend on the type of style (bubble, sharp, round) you want to obtain. Mark the outline with the pencil and don’t press down too hard. Gently make almost visible lines. You might make some errors here, but that’s alright. It will definitely take some time and practice to get it right. As you’re drawing and outlining, there can be changes made in the middle as well (remember, no rules).

Step 5: The secret that enhances any writing are the lines and its proportions. Depending on how thick or thin they might be, you can create the illusion of a 3D art. Fill in the shades between each letters with the pencil just as you would in normal sketching. Then with a marker, you can darken the empty spaces which will look like shadows of each letter on the page.

Step 6: As each letters form their own designs with the pencil, you can start adding the details as you like. Take a light pencil and make the illusion part of your art. What I mean is, let’s say you have an “i” in the name you chose. You can draw a star, lightning bolt, or something else instead of the regular dot on the letter. Same goes for other letters as well. You can draw a bubble around the entire drawing or imitate the drawings from the comic books.

Step 7: After you finish the detailing on your drawing, make another copy. If, at any given point, you make a mistake that can’t be rectified, the backup drawing can save all your work. Make a couple of copies so you can fill them in with different colors. Take the original drawing now and darken the lines with the pencil or a marker. These lines will be permanent, but don’t let that discourage you. It’s perfectly fine to make mistakes. You can start over again with the copies. If the lines are too thick or too thin, you can just make the entire drawing in that way to look even.

Step 8: Now it’s time to add some vibrant colors to your drawing. You can use color pencils or markers to fill in the colors. However, before you begin, take a look at some color combination and ideas. Comic books can be of great help or you can click pictures of some graffiti that you find in the city. Mix and match colors on the letters or keep the entire word in one color, the possibilities are endless. Follow your imagination and you can create a unique drawing on your own.

Learning to Draw Graffiti

Today, megalopolises are the nerve center of graffiti, as a modern art. Though it’s the subject of much criticism, being used as a vandalism tool, there are many commissioned artists who work around the world to create some of the most beautiful graffiti paintings. Graffiti has been used by many artists in expressing rebellion against all kinds of authoritarian regimes and conformism. If you are planning to create your very own, first graffito, this Buzzle article will definitely be an interesting read.

Observation

The question of how to do graffiti can be well answered by following the first basic step of any art form that is observation. Learning to appreciate great pieces of graffiti art is the first step as an initiate. If you only keep your eyes open, while driving around town, you will find scores of graffiti art pieces, painted on city walls. Get familiar with the various styles of graffiti, ranging from stencils, 3D, bubble, BBoy, billboard, cartoons and other new emerging trends. To know a style is not just about appreciating its aesthetics. It’s also about learning technique. Know what kind of colors and painting tools have been used. Analyze a composition aesthetically and technically. Learn how to use spray cans and other tools, to compose your first graffito. Start with your own home wall!

Make Your Own Impression

Once you have acquired the basic skills of how to make graffiti, you can begin applying what you have learned. Try to make a graffiti that can be your logo. Most artists have a signature logo, which they use. Your creativity comes into the picture now. You have to decide what you have to draw; the concept should be generated within your mind. You can also take graffiti tips from graffiti masters and schools. You can learn some of the styles through imitation. However, the only way to grow as a graffiti artist or as any kind of artist is to be original. There is no set pattern for a graffiti. It could be letters, a landscape, abstract art or anything that comes out of your fertile imagination. It is extending the painting canvas to walls, that’s all. There are no boundaries and set structures.

Graffiti Tips

Background
First make a background for a smooth finish to the graffiti. Make use of light colors such as white or gray to make the background. Once the background is ready, make use of small cap spray cans, to draw the outline. The outline should be of light color and should merge well with the background. The outline is just for your convenience and not to stand out. Once the outline is over, go ahead with real painting and make the graffiti as per your plan.

Colors
The colors of the graffiti are also very important and hence basic color wheel should be kept in mind while deciding the color combination. To make your graffiti look tidy and neat, fill in all the space that is available. Do not leave gaps within your graffiti. Fill all the gaps with proper color strokes. Find a local graffiti artist and apprentice him for a while, to know about the nuances of the art, until you are ready to go on your own.
You may make use of 3D effects. With the use of thin, dull color strokes, you can create a three dimensional effect. To make a thin line, hold the can near the wall and make a fast stroke. This will limit the spreading of the paint and give you a sharp thin line. Get to know as much as you can about graffiti culture and its unique terminology.

Basic Techniques of Oil Painting

There are different oil painting techniques without which one cannot paint to one’s potential. However, grasping these techniques will take a considerable amount of study. Some of the basics pertaining to these techniques are as follows:

Dagger Stroke : This stroke is not about trying to capture any sort of image on the canvas, but is about empowering the canvas with one’s creative energy. To comprehend the pros of this stroke, one needs to realize how a subject or image is molded. In oil painting, one is actually molding the image, similar to what a sculptor would do with clay. The strokes require energy and involve dagger shapes brought onto the canvas surface by the brush. The most interesting aspect about this stroke is that the end result can be so crude and raw, that nobody except the artist knows what has been painted. However, the subject in question will be hidden in the foundation. According to the artist’s desire, the subject can be subtly or boldly revealed to the viewers. The subtleness of these strokes can keep viewers mesmerized for years together.

Painting Knife Technique : This stroke helps create fantastic effects using just one stroke. For example, one can create the tail feathers of a parrot using this technique. This technique involves the use of a painting knife, wherein one can thrust all the creative energy onto the canvas just like the dagger stroke, but quicker. The paint is spread onto the canvas using the knife. However, the results of both, the dagger stroke and the painting knife stroke are very different.

Blending Technique : Once the creative energy has been brought onto the canvas, it’s time to refine the painting. Refining helps remove raw paint, which could otherwise cause problems in the future. Moreover, refining assists in the commencement of the subject’s molding process. Blending should be used as technique engaged in empowering and refining raw paint. This technique should be used as sparingly as possible, so as to enable the vast multitude of other paint effects. Oft, it is observed that too much blending results in the reduction of visual energy in the painting. For subjects embedded with softness and several light effects such as fog, mist, spray, etc., the blending technique is not a good idea.

Caress Stroke : What makes oil paints all the more gorgeous is its butterfly silk texture. This stroke is applied with the brush in a flat position onto the canvas. One can even change the color of the underpaint by this technique. Besides altering the color, this stroke also enhances the texture of the painting. For these strokes, the paint is loaded into the brush such that it lightly touches the painting surface, so as to attain a sensitive approach.